Pretty in Pink

As I’ve described in earlier Blog posts this year, Spring appeared with a burst of golden yellows in our cottage garden; the Forsythia and Daffodils and these were followed by the white blossom of the Japanese Shirota and Cherry Trees; the latter offering a subtlety of the palest pink, upon closer inspection.

Now, the advent of early Summer has triggered the arrival of pinks and purples. Here, you can see a beautiful rose; planted last year.  Then there is the pretty Deutzia, which offers a stunning spray of pink blossom.

Alongside the burst of pinks we have some lovely purples coming through.  Here, French Lavender delights and offers a bounty for local Bees.  On the right, Chives are now in flower and I find these too are very popular with our much needed Bees.

Similarly, Welsh Onions are growing in our veg patch and these are in flower; a white with a hint of lime green flower that the Bees adore:

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On the subject of Bees, we have Bees in the eaves of our cottage, over our front door.  From inside, we can faintly hear the Bees buzzing.  They come to us every two years.  Does anyone have any experience of Bees in the eaves?  Is there anything we should do, watch out for or be mindful of?  Any knowledge on this would be helpful and much appreciated.  We think it’s okay to leave them alone to do what they do, but is there anything else we need to know?

I checked our Cherry Tree today and found that it is covered in fruit.  These cherries are large and, once they turn scarlet red, they go on to become big juicy black cherries. We enjoy watching the birds come to eat the cherries, but we manage each year to save a crop for ourselves.  One problem is Wood Pigeons who will sit atop the small tree, once the fruit is ready, and they not only eat the fruit, but they strip the leaves in places.  Is there anything we can do to dissuade them from stripping the leaves?

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In my role as Counsellor and Psychotherapist, I encourage my clients to take up gardening.  The care and nurturing involved, as well as the nutrition if you grown your own produce, not to mention the delight of watching beautiful flowers appear, all have such therapeutic benefits.

Equally enjoyable today, it must be said, was lunch in the delightful ‘G & T’s Café’; superb food and sublime cakes.  We were four very content village folk:

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